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It’s okay to have questions about organ donation! You can see a full list of myths and facts from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, where I got this more concise list from. You can also ask me questions via my Facebook page or Twitter.

Myth

I have a medical condition, so I can’t be a donor.

Fact

Anyone, regardless of age or medical history, can sign up to be a donor.

The transplant team will determine at an individual’s time of death whether donation is possible.

There are very few conditions that would prevent a person from becoming a donor—such as HIV infection, active cancer, or a systemic infection. You should still consider registering. Even with an illness, you may be able to donate your organs or tissues.

Myth

I don’t think my religion supports donation.

Fact

Most major religions in the United States support organ donation and consider donation as the final act of love and generosity toward others.

Myth

If they see I’m a donor at the hospital, they won’t try to save my life.

Fact

When you are sick or injured and admitted to a hospital, the one and only priority is to save your life.

Myth

Rich or famous people on the waiting list get organs faster.

Fact

A national computer system matches donated organs to recipients.

The factors used in matching include blood type, time spent waiting, other important medical information, how sick the person is, and geographic location. Race, income, and celebrity are not considered.

Myth

People in the LGBT community can’t donate.

Fact

There is no policy or federal regulation that excludes a member of the LGBT community from donating organs.

What matters in donating organs is the health of the organs.

Myth

I’m too old to be a donor.

Fact

There’s no age limit to organ donation.

To date, the oldest donor in the U.S. was age 92. What matters is the health and condition of your organs when you die.